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"If we encounter a man of rare intellect, we should ask him what books he reads."
-Ralph Waldo Emerson-

Book of the Month: Crazy Love

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Book of the Month: Crazy Love

Crazy Love
by Francis Chan
248.4 CHA

If you want to be motivated in your faith, READ THIS BOOK.  It’s not for the faint of heart.  Instead, it is for Christians who want to get serious about their faith.  If you read between the lines, it may be the story of Frances Chan’s own spiritual journey from being a “tepid” Christian to one who is passionate about how he lives his life.  “Having faith often means doing what others see as crazy.  His passion shines through every paragraph of this message.

What is Chan passionate about, you ask?   One thing that grabs him is the Bible itself – God’s Word.  He reads it like it actually means what it says.  And he asks what would happen if we all read the Bible with equal sincerity and belief.  What do we do with the verse: “We know that we have come to know him if we obey his commands?”  (1 John 2:3-4). There are more where this came from.  Chan encourages believers to move from complacency to courage, from being satisfied to surrendered to Christ.

But, he does give believers some latitude.  Rather than have us doubt our salvation, he grants that “in the midst of our failed attempts at loving Jesus, His grace covers us.”  That is a good thing, because there is certainly a learning curve in our journeys to get to the lifestyle Chan is talking about.  He is also passionate that we do not continue to be “lukewarm” Christians.  Lukewarm believers “do whatever is necessary to keep themselves from feeling too guilty.”  Lukewarm believers “think about life on earth much more often than eternity in heaven.”  Lukewarm believers “will serve God and others, but there are limits to how far they will go or how much time, money, and energy they are willing to give.  Do any of these hit a nerve?  They certainly did with this scribe.

Chan’s greatest passion seems to be for the poor.  A serious impact on his lifestyle was made during a mission trip to Africa.  He saw how poor the people were – how they lived a subsistence existence – and realized how his own family lived in such luxury in comparison.  Downsizing his house, despite his five children, was the only faithful response that made sense.  In 1 John 3:17, it is declared that “If anyone has material possessions and sees his brother in need but has no pity on him, how can the love of God be in him?”  Giving is a natural answer to loving Jesus.  “As we love more genuinely and deeply, giving becomes the obvious and natural response.”   The basis of this response comes from Matthew 25:40.  “Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me.”  This verse expects us to treat the poor and the desperate as if they were Christ Himself.  This is crazy love!

Can we move from being “lukewarm” Christians to being “obsessed” by love for Christ?  “People who are obsessed with God are known as givers, not takers.  Obsessed people genuinely think that others matter as much as they do, and they are particularly aware of those who are poor around the world.”  “A person who is obsessed is characterized by committed, passionate love for God, above and before every other thing and every other being.”  This is Chan’s call to us – to become so obsessed with Christ that nothing else matters.  Will you hear the call?

If you want to be motivated in your faith, READ THIS BOOK.  It’s not for the faint of heart.  Instead, it is for Christians who want to get serious about their faith.  If you read between the lines, it may be the story of Frances Chan’s own spiritual journey from being a “tepid” Christian to one who is passionate about how he lives his life.  “Having faith often means doing what others see as crazy.  His passion shines through every paragraph of this message.

What is Chan passionate about, you ask?   One thing that grabs him is the Bible itself – God’s Word.  He reads it like it actually means what it says.  And he asks what would happen if we all read the Bible with equal sincerity and belief.  What do we do with the verse: “We know that we have come to know him if we obey his commands?”  (1 John 2:3-4). There are more where this came from.  Chan encourages believers to move from complacency to courage, from being satisfied to surrendered to Christ.

But, he does give believers some latitude.  Rather than have us doubt our salvation, he grants that “in the midst of our failed attempts at loving Jesus, His grace covers us.”  That is a good thing, because there is certainly a learning curve in our journeys to get to the lifestyle Chan is talking about.  He is also passionate that we do not continue to be “lukewarm” Christians.  Lukewarm believers “do whatever is necessary to keep themselves from feeling too guilty.”  Lukewarm believers “think about life on earth much more often than eternity in heaven.”  Lukewarm believers “will serve God and others, but there are limits to how far they will go or how much time, money, and energy they are willing to give.  Do any of these hit a nerve?  They certainly did with this scribe.

Chan’s greatest passion seems to be for the poor.  A serious impact on his lifestyle was made during a mission trip to Africa.  He saw how poor the people were – how they lived a subsistence existence – and realized how his own family lived in such luxury in comparison.  Downsizing his house, despite his five children, was the only faithful response that made sense.  In 1 John 3:17, it is declared that “If anyone has material possessions and sees his brother in need but has no pity on him, how can the love of God be in him?”  Giving is a natural answer to loving Jesus.  “As we love more genuinely and deeply, giving becomes the obvious and natural response.”   The basis of this response comes from Matthew 25:40.  “Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me.”  This verse expects us to treat the poor and the desperate as if they were Christ Himself.  This is crazy love!

Can we move from being “lukewarm” Christians to being “obsessed” by love for Christ?  “People who are obsessed with God are known as givers, not takers.  Obsessed people genuinely think that others matter as much as they do, and they are particularly aware of those who are poor around the world.”  “A person who is obsessed is characterized by committed, passionate love for God, above and before every other thing and every other being.”  This is Chan’s call to us – to become so obsessed with Christ that nothing else matters.  Will you hear the call?

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Justice & Racial Reconciliation

General Information

First Floor Welcome Room

Welcome Room

Conveniently located near the main entrance to the church just off the Lobby in the Welcome Room.  (Catalog #100-#241)

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Third Floor Upper Rotunda

UR Connie w Family586x474

Conveniently located next to the Sanctuary Balcony seating area and Child Care Center, just take the main staircase or elevator to the third floor.  (Catalog #242 and above)

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The library is open and available for use whenever the Church is open. The Library is staffed Sunday mornings as well as Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

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Both Locations

Special Displays

These include Sermon series and featured topics.  If you are unable to find a book on the shelf, please check the special displays.

Literary Night

Literary Night 2016 - Native Sons: Belonging, Hope, Race, and the American Dream

What makes us American?  What holds us together as a nation?  How does a person find his place in the American Dream?  How do factors like race and violence affect our sense of belonging and what hope can we find for the future? 

BOOK SUMMARIES

Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow

Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
Summary by Sparknotes

Alexander Hamilton was most likely born on January 11, 1757 on the Caribbean island of St. Kitts to Rachel Fawcett and James Hamilton, but he spent the majority of his youth on the island of St. Croix. His formal education as a child was minimal.  When his mother died in 1768, Hamilton took his first job as a clerk in the offices of merchant Nicholas Cruger, keeping the business records and coordinating business efforts between the merchant ship captains, government officials, and planters.  Cruger and a local Presbyterian minister, Rev. Hugh Knox, recognized Hamilton’s genius and persuaded him to leave St. Croix for New York City, which he did in 1772.

In New York, Hamilton attended several preparatory academies and schools to prepare himself for college and eventually enrolled in Columbia. In 1776, Hamilton withdrew from college and joined a local New York militia to fight in the American Revolution against the British.  He served as an artillery captain and quickly moved up in the ranks, finally spending four years as Gen. Washington’s attaché, participating in the Battle of Yorktown and the Battle of Monmouth.

Hamilton left the military in 1781 and married Betsey Schuyler. Working diligently to pass the New York bar exam, he became one of its most prominent lawyers in the early 1780s.  Hamilton also began his political career at this time, serving first as a national tax agent and then as one of New York’s representatives at the National Congress in Philadelphia.  In 1786, Hamilton was represented New York State at a national convention held in Annapolis, Maryland, to amend the Articles of Confederation.  When only a few of the delegates from the other states bothered to attend, Hamilton called for a second convention to be held in Philadelphia in 1787.  This time the delegates took the invitation more seriously and created the outline for a new government by drafting the Constitution.

Hamilton did not actually participate in drafting the Constitution and argued that a new and stronger central government was needed to correct the mistakes made in the government outlined in the Articles of Confederation. Many of the other delegates felt his ideas were too radical and labeled Hamilton an extremist.

Nevertheless, when the new Constitution was presented to the delegates, Hamilton signed the document. He believed the Constitution was a step in the right direction and also believed that if it was not approved, the entire union could collapse.  With this in mind, Hamilton returned to New York where he published a series of essays to encourage the people of New York to ratify the Constitution.  Co-authored with John Jay and James Madison, the collection came to be known as the Federalist Papers..  These essays succeeded in convincing Americans to ratify the Constitution.

In 1790, Alexander Hamilton became President Washington’s first Secretary of the Treasury, writing five key reports that established American economic policy. His reports on the Public Credit argued that the United States government should assume the debts of all the state governments and encouraged Congress to pay the interest on the debts the country owed, not just the principle.  He believed that these measures would give credibility and stability to the American economic system.  He also wrote a report to convince Congress to establish a national bank to control the country’s finances and followed this up with a report encouraging Congress to draft a Mint Act to create a national mint and stable national currency.

Hamilton also wrote the prophetic On the Subject of Manufactures, which argued that the United States should shift the bulk of its economy from agriculture to industry.  Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson disagreed, believing that a nation based on business would jeopardize the republican ideals the nation was founded upon.  Hamilton and Jefferson differed on other issues, most notably in their interpretations of the Constitution.  Their battles spread throughout the nation and laid the foundation for the first political parties.

As Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton also became involved in foreign policy, encouraging President Washington to send John Jay to England and France to negotiate an end to their disputes with the United States. Hamilton resigned from his cabinet position in 1795 and returned to his law practice.  His involvement in politics after the late 1790s did his cause more harm than good.  In the election of 1800, Hamilton inadvertently split the Federalist Party which allowed his rival, Thomas Jefferson, to become President.

In 1804, Hamilton wrote a series of essays against another rival, Aaron Burr, that was partly responsible for Burr’s loss in that year’s New York gubernatorial race. Burr blamed Hamilton for his loss and challenged Hamilton to a duel in which he shot Hamilton.  Hamilton died the next day, on July 11, 1804, at the age of forty-seven.

These are the facts of the book, but there is much more to this well-researched manuscript. It is a saga of the birth of a nation and testifies that the process did not always go smoothly.  In fact, it shows the Founding Fathers, as more than individuals – as a body of passionate souls pulling and pushing to give shape to this unique new form of government.  It reveals the strengths of our early leaders, as well as their foibles.

And what of Alexander Hamilton, a previous footnote in American History? Chernow elevates him to the well-deserved level of “The Indispensable Man of American Government.”  What do you think?

Native Son by Richard Wright

Native Son by Richard Wright
Summary by SparkNotes

Bigger Thomas, a poor, uneducated, twenty-year-old black man in 1930s Chicago, wakes up one morning in his family’s cramped apartment on the South Side of the city. He sees a huge rat scamper across the room, which he corners and kills with a skillet. Having grown up under the climate of harsh racial prejudice in 1930s America, Bigger is burdened with a powerful conviction that he has no control over his life and that he cannot aspire to anything other than menial, low-wage labor. His mother pesters him to take a job with a rich white man named Mr. Dalton, but Bigger instead chooses to meet up with his friends to plan the robbery of a white man’s store.

Anger, fear, and frustration define Bigger’s daily existence, as he is forced to hide behind a façade of toughness or risk succumbing to despair. While Bigger and his gang have robbed many black-owned businesses, they have never attempted to rob a white man. Bigger sees whites not as individuals, but as a natural, oppressive force—a great looming “whiteness” pressing down upon him. Bigger’s fear of confronting this force overwhelms him, but rather than admit his fear, he violently attacks a member of his gang to sabotage the robbery. Left with no other options, Bigger takes a job as a chauffeur for the Daltons.

Coincidentally, Mr. Dalton is also Bigger’s landlord, as he owns a controlling share of the company that manages the apartment building where Bigger’s family lives. Mr. Dalton and other wealthy real estate barons are effectively robbing the poor, black tenants on Chicago’s South Side—they refuse to allow blacks to rent apartments in predominantly white neighborhoods, thus leading to overpopulation and artificially high rents in the predominantly black South Side. Mr. Dalton sees himself as a benevolent philanthropist, however, as he donates money to black schools and offers jobs to “poor, timid black boys” like Bigger. However, Mr. Dalton practices this token philanthropy mainly to alleviate his guilty conscience for exploiting poor blacks.

Mary, Mr. Dalton’s daughter, frightens and angers Bigger by ignoring the social taboos that govern the relations between white women and black men. On his first day of work, Bigger drives Mary to meet her communist boyfriend, Jan. Eager to prove their progressive ideals and racial tolerance, Mary and Jan force Bigger to take them to a restaurant in the South Side. Despite Bigger’s embarrassment, they order drinks, and as the evening passes, all three of them get drunk. Bigger then drives around the city while Mary and Jan make out in the back seat. Afterward, Mary is too drunk to make it to her bedroom on her own, so Bigger helps her up the stairs. Drunk and aroused by his unprecedented proximity to a young white woman, Bigger begins to kiss Mary.

Just as Bigger places Mary on her bed, Mary’s blind mother, Mrs. Dalton, enters the bedroom. Though Mrs. Dalton cannot see him, her ghostlike presence terrifies him. Bigger worries that Mary, in her drunken condition, will reveal his presence. He covers her face with a pillow and accidentally smothers her to death. Unaware that Mary has been killed, Mrs. Dalton prays over her daughter and returns to bed. Bigger tries to conceal his crime by burning Mary’s body in the Daltons’ furnace. He decides to try to use the Daltons’ prejudice against communists to frame Jan for Mary’s disappearance. Bigger believes that the Daltons will assume Jan is dangerous and that he may have kidnapped their daughter for political purposes. Additionally, Bigger takes advantage of the Daltons’ racial prejudices to avoid suspicion, continuing to play the role of a timid, ignorant black servant who would be unable to commit such an act.

Mary’s murder gives Bigger a sense of power and identity he has never known. Bigger’s girlfriend, Bessie, makes an offhand comment that inspires him to try to collect ransom money from the Daltons. They know only that Mary has vanished, not that she is dead. Bigger writes a ransom letter, playing upon the Daltons’ hatred of communists by signing his name “Red.” He then bullies Bessie to take part in the ransom scheme. However, Mary’s bones are found in the furnace, and Bigger flees with Bessie to an empty building. Bigger rapes Bessie and, frightened that she will give him away, bludgeons her to death with a brick after she falls asleep.

Bigger eludes the massive manhunt for as long as he can, but he is eventually captured after a dramatic shoot-out. The press and the public determine his guilt and his punishment before his trial even begins. The furious populace assumes that he raped Mary before killing her and burned her body to hide the evidence of the rape. Moreover, the white authorities and the white mob use Bigger’s crime as an excuse to terrorize the entire South Side .

Jan visits Bigger in jail. He says that he understands how he terrified, angered, and shamed Bigger through his violation of the social taboos that govern tense race relations. Jan enlists his friend, Boris A. Max, to defend Bigger free of charge. Jan and Max speak with Bigger as a human being, and Bigger begins to see whites as individuals and himself as their equal.

Max tries to save Bigger from the death penalty, arguing that while his client is responsible for his crime, it is vital to recognize that he is a product of his environment. Part of the blame for Bigger’s crimes belongs to the fearful, hopeless existence that he has experienced in a racist society since birth. Max warns that there will be more men like Bigger if America does not put an end to the vicious cycle of hatred and vengeance. Despite Max’s arguments, Bigger is sentenced to death.

Bigger is not a traditional hero by any means. However, Wright forces us to enter into Bigger’s mind and to understand the devastating effects of the social conditions in which he was raised. Bigger was not born a violent criminal. He is a “native son”: a product of American culture and the violence and racism that suffuse it.

The Son by Philipp Meyer

The Son by Philipp Meyer
Summary by BookRags

The rise and fall of a Texas family made rich in the oil and cattle businesses is detailed in the novel “The Son” by Philipp Meyer. The story spans six generations of the McCullough family from the time it claimed its first headright in Texas through its rise to great wealth to its tragic end. A myriad of themes wind their way through the novel. These include discrimination, family life, cultural relationships, religion, sexuality, death and dying, and wealth and morality.

The bulk of the story is told through the voices of three key members of the family. These include Eli “The Colonel” McCullough, Peter McCullough and Jeanne Anne McCullough. The Colonel is the patriarch of the family. He survived a raid by Comanche Indians on his family’s homestead and lived three years with the tribe. Upon his return to civilization, he survived many years as a Texas Ranger. During his time back in “civilization” he saw the way rich cotton men manipulated their circumstances to get what they wanted. Eli decides he is capable of this as well and does not discourage his fellow Rangers from attacking a band of Union soldiers whom they believe are hauling gold. Eli takes his portion of the loot and buys land for a cattle ranch. His early days on the ranch are made difficult by his Mexican neighbor, Arturo Garcia, whom he believes raids his ranch just a few days after he and his men have returned from their first cattle drive. Eli tries to talk to Arturo but he denies any involvement in the theft though Eli knows the man is responsible because livestock tracks led from his ranch through Arturo’s land. Eli later arranges for Arturo’s family to be killed and Arturo to be shot.

The second narrative voice is that of Peter McCullough, The Colonel’s middle son. The Colonel calls Peter the “son of my disgrace” because Peter ran off to Mexico to live with Maria Garcia, a member of the family that The Colonel considers the family’s mortal enemy. Peter does not have the combative spirit of his father and stands against The Colonel the night that a group of men ride to the Garcia home because they believe the sons-in-law of Pedro Garcia, nephew of Arturo, are responsible for wounding Peter’s son, Glenn. Although Peter tells his father he does not want a war against the Garcias, his father and the men begin shooting anyway. All of the Garcia family, with the exception of Maria, is killed. Maria later comes to the McCullough home seeking help. Peter takes her in despite his father’s wishes.

The third narrator in the novel is Jeanne McCullough, the great-granddaughter of The Colonel. She spends a good deal of time in her formative years with her great-grandfather and while she inherits his drive to make the ranch profitable, the fact that she is female is a mark against her. After the death of her husband, she struggles to get her employees to take her seriously as a boss. Her drive to succeed at her job overshadows her family life, however. As Jeanne lies dying she wonders who might take over the ranch. Her daughter is spoiled and addicted to drugs. Her son is a homosexual who has done little with his life but spend his mother’s money. Her grandchildren seem to have no interest in the ranch.

Ulises Garcia, who is a relative of the McCulloughs through the union of Peter and Maria, exhibits the same drive as The Colonel and Jeanne. He gets a job at the McCullough ranch in hopes that he can earn Jeanne’s good graces and be accepted. Instead, when he goes to introduce himself to her, she stumbles and falls backward causing what Ulises believes is a fatal injury. Knowing he will be blamed for the old lady’s death, Ulises covers up the accident by unscrewing the gas line in the kitchen, which he knows will eventually cause an explosion as the fireplace in the living room is lit. He rides away swearing that he will make a name for himself that no one will ever forget.

VIDEO CLIPS

Hamilton (the musical)

PRESENTERS

Scott Dudley is Senior Pastor of Bellevue Presbyterian Church in Bellevue, Washington.  He earned a Ph.D. from Stanford University in English Literature and a Master’s of Divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary.  He has taught numerous writing and literature courses at Stanford and Seattle Pacific University and continues to be a part of academia by serving on two university boards.

Christina Dudley, Scott’s wife and fellow Stanford grad, is the author of six novels, including The Beresfords, which the Seattle Times called “ingenious and entertaining…”  When her own nose isn’t buried in a book, she enjoys editing and consulting for other writers and blogging for the Bellevue Farmers Market as the UrbanFarmJunkie.

Literary Night Archive

Literary Night 2016 - Native Sons: Belonging, Hope, Race, and the American Dream

What makes us American?  What holds us together as a nation?  How does a person find his place in the American Dream?  How do factors like race and violence affect our sense of belonging and what hope can we find for the future? 

Literary Night 2015: The West & the American Imagination

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Literary Night 2014: Science, Religion, & The Other

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Literary Night 2013: Money Makes the World Go 'Round

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Literary Night 2012: Exile & Homecoming

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Literary Night 2011: The American Dream

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Literary Night 2007: What Makes a Hero?

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Literary Night 2006: Love, Marriage, and Family

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Literary Night 2005: Paradise to Perdition

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Kid’s Corner

BelPres Preschool Story Time

Christian stories, songs, and crafts 2nd Wednesday of each month October-June

10:30-11:15am 3rd Floor Upper Rotunda Library

A special program for toddlers and preschool children accompanied by an adult.

Top 20 Resources for Kids

Top 20 Resources for Kids

  1. VeggieTales: Princess Petunia’s sweet apple pie     JE POT
  2. The Berenstain Bears: God made the Seasons     JE BER
  3. The Easter Story     JHE PIN
  4. God, I need to Talk to you about… (series)     J 248.4 LEI
  5. All Afloat on Noah’s boat!     JP MIT
  6. The Book of Jonah     J 224
  7. The Berenstain Bears go to Sunday school     JE BER
  8. Heroes of the Bible: Stand Up, Stand Tall, Stand Strong! (VeggieTales)     DVD
  9. VeggieTales: Bob & Larry in the Case of the Missing Patience     JE POT
  10. The Berenstain Bears help the homeless     JE BER
  11. The Berenstain Bears: Honey Hunt Helpers     JE BER
  12. The Berenstain Bears: Let the Bible be your guide     J BER
  13. The Berenstain Bears: Mama’s helpers     JE BER
  14. The Berenstain Bears: Faith gets us through     JE BER
  15. Sweetpea Beauty: A girl after God’s own heart     DVD
  16. VeggieTales: Bob and Larry’s Creation Vacation     JE POT
  17. God loves your nose     JB BER
  18. My Valentine Story: Giving my heart to God     JHV BOW
  19. Jesus and his friends     JE 232.9 JES
  20. VeggieTales: Bob & Larry in the Case of the Messy SleepOver     JE VT.

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Summer Reading Adventure 2016 Kids’ Submissions

Library Team

Library Team

Volunteer

The Library is run almost completely by volunteer staff. You’ll see our Library Team in action on Sunday mornings from 10 am – 12 noon. If you are interested in helping out, please contact GetConnected, email the Library coordinator, or leave a message on the Library voice mail at (425) 454-3082, ext. 3399. Volunteer opportunities include:

  • Research and resource support
  • Website management
  • Social media
  • Library host/hostess
  • Process new materials
  • Repair materials
  • Book, movie, and audio reviews
  • Story Time
  • Assist with publicity

Library Volunteer Opportunities

Contact: GetConnected
Department: Library
Frequency: Once a month

Be available for 30 minutes following one of the Sunday morning worship services to help welcome Library patrons to the Welcome Room or Upper Rotunda location, assist with their resource questions and needs, and encourage proper use of check-out procedures.

Volunteer Registration

  • Please indicate the areas in which you have interest in serving.
Contact: GetConnected
Department: Library
Frequency: Once a month

Write book reviews that will inform a potential reader of the purpose and contents of a book and encourage use of Library resources.  The candidate should enjoy reading and writing and have excellent fluency in both, have a working knowledge of MS Word and an email program, and have good communication skills.

Volunteer Registration

  • Please indicate the areas in which you have interest in serving.
Contact: GetConnected
Frequency: Twice a month or as needed

Assist with maintenance of the Library webpages in order to provide updated information and increase awareness of Library resources and ministries.

Volunteer Registration

  • Please indicate the areas in which you have interest in serving.
Contact: GetConnected
Frequency: Once a month

Create theme-based, creative, appealing displays of Library resources that will encourage our faith community and Eastside neighbors to utilize resources.

Volunteer Registration

  • Please indicate the areas in which you have interest in serving.
Contact: GetConnected

Read Christian stories and provide related crafts for Toddlers and Preschoolers, ages 2-5.  October – June, 2nd Wednesdays, from 10:00 – 11:00 A.M.

Volunteer Registration

  • Please indicate the areas in which you have interest in serving.
Contact: GetConnected
Frequency: Once a month

Encourage patrons to return overdue resources in a timely manner so that they may be made available to others.

Volunteer Registration

  • Please indicate the areas in which you have interest in serving.

Kandis Losh

Library Ministries Coordinator

Contact Us

425-454-3082  ext. 3399

The Library is staffed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9:00-3:00 and on Sundays, 10:00-12:30.

Resources

Click below to discover resources to guide you in your Christian journey, inform your faith, and draw you deeper into relationship with Jesus.

Book Groups

Men’s Good Book Group
Meets: Wednesdays, 6:30-7:45 am, Welcome Room S-137
Contact: John Meisel   jmeisel@hotmail.com
2016 Readings:

Women’s Book Club
Meets: Thursdays, 1:00-2:30 pm, Welcome Room S-137
Contact: Linda Grundberg   lindagrundberg@hotmail.com
2016 Readings:
We meet at lunchtime, so bring a sack lunch if desired.  We alternate between novels and
     non-fiction and discuss all books from our Christian point of view.

Widow’s Fellowship Book Group
Meets: 2nd Thursday, 1:00-3:00 pm, S-224
Contact: Elaine Hendrickson   joelaine@comcast.net
2016 Readings:
Our group is a part of the Widows Fellowship group at FPCB.  We meet once a month but not in the summer. We tend to read fiction, both current and classic, as well as books with religious themes, history and biographies. We try to look for God or the lack of God in all we read.  Although we are part of the widow’s group, anyone who is interested is welcome to join us.

Recommend a Book

Library Materials Request

The Library would like to know which resources users would like to see added to our collections. These requests will be used to inform the purchase of new Library materials as funds are available. Please do not donate materials without notifying the Library ministry coordinator or Library team member first.

Donate

THANK YOU FOR YOUR DESIRE TO DONATE TO OUR LIBRARY COLLECTION!

The Library is able to accept direct financial donations once a year during our annual Literary Night’s freewill offering.

Purchase of In-Kind Book Donations

  • Any donation of purchased books may be made “in honor of”  or  “in memory of”  and will have a bookplate included indicating such a gift.
  • Purchases are encouraged through our local Christian bookstores: Harvest Logos in Seattle; Cokesbury or Family Christian in Kirkland; and Lifeway in Tukwila.

I Own Books I Want to Donate

If your item(s) meets the collection development criteria below, the Library Coordinator will consider adding the item(s) to our collection.

  • Timeliness– published within the last 5 years, and not duplicating a resource currently in our collection
  • Scope– the breadth of subject matter covered
  • Relevance– to BelPres academic programs and Christian growth and development (general books that can be found in a public library are usually not part of our collection.)
  • Appropriateness of content and format, and within evangelical reformed theology
  • Literary or scholarly quality
  • Physical condition– no underlining, highlighting, notes, yellowed or torn pages

Please do not leave any donations without first receiving permission from the Library Coordinator or designated library volunteer. All donations left that do not meet the above criteria will be put on the “Free Books” cart. Accepted donations become the property of BelPres and the Library reserves the right to dispose of unnecessary materials in any way it sees fit.

What makes us American?  What holds us together as a nation?  How does a person find his place in the American Dream?  How do factors like race and violence affect our sense of belonging and what hope can we find for the future? 

BOOK SUMMARIES

Donation Receipt

Receipt First Presbyterian Church of Bellevue 1717 Bellevue Way NE Bellevue, WA 98004 Date donation received: ____________________ Donated by:_______________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________ Title of book(s):_____________________________________________ Date of receipt of donation____________________________________ Location of receipt of donation: Bellevue Presbyterian Church Authority to receive: Kandis Losh, Library Coordinator