KidREACH Connections

Meet Miabella, Fifolu, Margaret, and Beth!

Fifolu and Beth are tutors who make a profound difference in the lives of their students. Neither has an educational background, but both have a heart for children and find tutoring to be very rewarding.

Summers are particularly hard for students who struggle academically. As early as Grade 1, summer learning loss can be recognized. By the end of grade 6; students who have experienced summer learning loss over the years, are an average of two years behind their peers.

This is especially true for the children of parents whose first language is other than English. Learning a new language (ELL) impacts more than a person’s language skills and vocabulary – if they can’t read the directions, how can they succeed in math?  Fifolu and Beth help level the playing field for Miabella and Margaret.

Thanks to Fifolu, Miabella, a delightful second grader is catching up. Children often come to BelPres KidREACH feeling overwhelmed and discouraged, but by the time they are in High School, many students qualify for Advanced Placement courses. Giving hope to Miabella inspires her whole family. Her mother just completed her High School Diploma and is now in college taking bookkeeping courses. Miabella’s sister is also a KidREACH alumnus. She is currently a successful college graduate, working as a bookkeeper.

Fifolu is not only a tutor; she is a role model. She takes her own grades seriously and has helped inspire Miabella to love learning, especially reading. Miabella also feels loved and supported. She looks forward to tutoring each week and works hard.

Margaret and Beth have also built a secure connection this year. Margaret, also a second grader, is a delight. Her parents say tutoring is the highlight of her week. She loves Beth and can hardly wait to see her.

Both families are immigrants, and neither family could afford to pay for a tutor. They speak highly of this ministry’s effectiveness. This is true for all the families we minister to by KidREACH. Most families at BelPres KidREACH are immigrants from countries such as Rwanda, Congo, Guatemala, Mexico, Ukraine, and more. They enroll their children in the KidREACH Summer Tutoring because they know it helps level the playing field. It is also a powerful way of bringing about social justice and racial reconciliation.

Make a profound difference in the life of a child – be a Summer Tutor.

Interested in being a Summer Tutor? Teaching background is not necessary; all you need is a heart for children and a desire to give a child hope for a better life. Curriculum and support are provided. Summer Tutoring is for 4 weeks on Thursdays from 6pm-8pm. The dates are July 18, July 25, August 1 and August 8. Get additional information, contact: belpresserve@belpres.org

Baby Basics – Family Snapshot Stories

Jacob began receiving diapers when he was nine months old. He lives with his young father and grandparents. His father works at a restaurant during the day while his grandmother babysits Jacob and his little cousin. (His grandmother is usually the one who picks up diapers at our once-a-month distributions.)  His grandmother works a swing shift so Jacob spends evenings with his father and grandfather. His father hopes to attend college or a trade school part-time. The family heard about Baby Basics through Hopelink.

Kyle was a newborn when he entered the Baby Basics program. We’ve had fun watching him grow from a tiny baby to a healthy toddler. His single mother works full-time at a local retail business to support Kyle and two school-aged children. Friends, relatives and part-time daycare provide childcare for Kyle. His family heard about the program through the School District’s Family Connection Counselors.

Edwin’s mom was referred to Baby Basics through a School District’s Family Connection Counselor where his sister attends. They were on the wait list for almost six months in 2016. They received one-time emergency diapers during that time and were given contact info for other community resources. When Edwin was eight months old, there was an open spot in the program. Edwin’s father works two jobs: one for a large local athletic club and the other for a cleaning company. When Edwin is a little older, his mother plans to work again. He is a sweet, shy little guy and loves his mom and sister.

Gwen entered the Baby Basics program when she was a year old. Her mom is still in high school and they live with Gwen’s grandparents who are hardworking and low-income. Gwen is a happy, healthy toddler.  Her mom is struggling to finish high school and will not graduate with her class. She works part-time at a fast food restaurant while attending school and parenting her little girl. She dropped out of high school at one point and may not now be attending. They were referred by a family member who knew about the program from Jubilee Reach.

One of the newest babies in our program, Anna, is four months old. Her parents learned about Baby Basics from the Family Connections Counselor at her brother’s school. Her father works full time for a local landscaping service. Anna’s mom does not work outside the home now and plans to work again as a housecleaner when her children are a little older.

These families all live, work and go to school in Bellevue while some other families we serve only work in Bellevue or go to school in Bellevue. Most live near Crossroads Mall. We have had a student from Eastside Academy and currently, we have several teen moms. Their stories show their lives to be challenging with minimum wage jobs, low education and living with extended family in small apartments. Generally, the families in the Baby Basics program are hopeful and want their children to have an education, more job opportunities than is available for them and a better future for their families. It is a privilege to get to know them and to watch their babies grow. They are all very grateful and sometimes embarrassed that they need help. Homelessness is very real to most of the families in the program.  Some have experienced homelessness and some have avoided it by living with extended family in crowded conditions.

“Love Where You Are” by donating diapers to build healthy families. Diapers 4, 5, and 6 are especially needed. Drop off diapers at playpens in lobbies on Mother’s Day or BelPres office.

Jesus For All

She sat across the table from me, her young sons flanking her, one on her left and one on her right. Seven days earlier they had given everything they had left to a man in Turkey to take them to Athens. The journey took them through the forest, along a muddy path by the river, evading fences, wild animals and border guards. They traveled at night and hid during the day. On the fourth day, they ran out of food. On the seventh day, they arrived in Athens, cold, wet, dirty, hungry and with no possessions. She had no one to turn to for help and no place to go. But then someone told her about a church, which was helping refugees, so she went there. They welcomed her and found her a place to stay in an old unheated building. Now she was sitting across from me to receive a free meal. I, along with a small team from

Seattle, had come to serve her and the nearly one hundred other refugees who were there that day. As she told me her story, her hands shook uncontrollably. She didn’t know if it was the cold weather or the trauma she had been through which caused the shaking.

Her story was that after a few years of marriage, her husband began to beat her regularly. Several times he made arrangements to loan her to his friends for a price. Finally, she had enough. She got brave and divorced him. At first, he didn’t want anything to do with her or the boys. So he gave them to her. But then he changed his mind and asked his friends to help him kill her. So she fled and left her country out of fear for her life. First, she went to Turkey. But when they told her they were going to send her back, she found the man who took her to Athens. “Today,” she said, “I am going to apply for my papers from the government.” These papers would allow her boys to go to school in Athens and permit her to work. But documents like this, she lamented, could take several months and sometimes up to a year to receive. After we ate, I gathered our group around her and prayed for her and her boys. Then she left.

The next day, we came again to serve meals. There she was, sitting at a different table, a big beautiful smile foretelling the announcement she was about to make. She had received her papers! But Jesus goodness and love was not unnoticed. Her oldest son explained that the reason why this happened was that we had prayed to our God! And like so many Muslims before them, who have fled their countries in the Middle East, this mother and her two boys eventually committed their lives to Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. Two months later, the pastor of the church we served in baptized them.

We are living in unprecedented times. We see the most significant turning of Muslims to faith in Christ since the birth of Islam. Coincidentally, Christians have been praying for Muslims to encounter the Risen Christ for over 30 years. Today’s movements are fueled by three decades of faithful prayers.

I am telling you this because May 6 marks the beginning of Ramadan for our Muslim neighbors and continues through June 4. Ramadan is the holiest month for Muslims. I want to invite you to join with Christians all over the world in praying for them and using something called the “Muslim World Prayer Guide” to help you. The Prayer Guide will introduce you to specific Muslim people and places where they live, like Egypt, Malaysia, Turkey, and Sudan. You will read the stories of Muslims who have encountered Jesus and learn specific things to pray for during this holy month. You can pick up a copy of the “Muslim World Prayer Guide” in the lobby today or download a PDF version at www.30daysprayer.com. Join the movement.

Gifts Continue to Give with the Alternative Gift Market

Thank you to everyone who purchased gifts from the BelPres Alternative Gift Market (AGM) last Christmas Season. The total raised by the 2018 AGM was $62,266. Every penny of the AGM funds goes directly toward your purchased gift. The funds are used by global and local ministries to support special projects and programs that fall out of their budget scope. It is exciting to send the money out and see the fruit from our support.
The cover of the 2018 AGM catalogue featured a refugee worker in one of the gardens. One of the global gift items was garden supplies for the refugees starting a new life and settling in Washington. This gift covered materials like seeds and tools to equip refugees to work in their garden preparing, planting, growing and harvesting their crops. Your donations raised over 1000 dollars for this gift.
World Relief shared new photos of recipients using tools bought with the most recent donations, and we want to share those with all of you who give so generously to support AGM each year. Chandra is from Bhutan, and he is holding some new tools that he will use to prepare his garden. Laylay is from Burma and is working in the garden with her daughter and her new hoe to turn over her garden bed winter cover crop.
Many thanks, again, for your support for the Alternative Gift Market. Your gifts make a difference in lives in our community and communities around the world.

Audience of One

Blogging for me is more therapeutic than anything else. Lately, people are asking me why I don’t blog more and when am I going to write again. Honestly, writing is hard. I’m not particularly good at it, and yet, it helps me process what is going on inside; especially, in my heart. I appreciate my friends’ encouragement though, so I’ll try to write more.

Looking back at my Lenten journey in college, it was a negative experience of my faith in Christ. After gathering on campus, we would all head out to different restaurants to just hang and connect. The only reason I knew it was Lent was all the water bottles everyone had, and no one was ordering food, even though we were at a restaurant. I remember asking: “Why is everyone carrying a water bottle? Why is no one eating at that whole table?” Oh yeah, it’s Lent! And they’re fasting. I thought why in the world meet in a restaurant if they weren’t going to eat. It was evident to everyone around them that they were fasting. Some were happy to talk about it. From that experience, I realized I couldn’t stand the public persona of spiritual discipline. It all looked and smelled of hypocrisy.

Jesus said, Matt. 6:16-18 “When you fast, do not look somber as the hypocrites do, for they disfigure their faces to show men they are fasting. I tell you the truth; they have received their reward in full. But when you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that it will not be obvious to people that you are fasting, but only to your Father, who is unseen; and your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.”

Jesus had it right: if you engage in spiritual disciplines, do it in private. God wants an audience of one; just you and Him. Even if you have to stop and break a spiritual discipline (because not doing so would make it public), then I would do it. You can reengage in a spiritual discipline afterward. Once it becomes public, there goes the ‘audience of one.’ More important than the discipline is our relationship with God. Since then, I rarely tell anyone of my spiritual discipline practice. I am far from where I want to be with spiritual disciplines, and I hope to continue becoming more and more like Jesus. He did things right.

The Impact of Short Term Missions

It is an honor for us to facilitate and receive ‘Mission Teams’ for service in Guatemala. These Teams come from across North America and sacrificially give of themselves for 7 to 14 days to evangelism, construction, teaching, food distribution, medical outreach and so much more. Truly, they bless Guatemalans and we thank God for each and every Team.

We have become increasingly aware of the impact on Team Members, the blessings they receive from our Staff, and those we serve. I thought it would be good to share a few testimonies from Team Members, trusting they will be an inspiration to you.

A Pastor wrote: “The effect of this Mission experience had on my personal and spiritual life was to focus more attention on people. I often become overly concerned for the organizational work that I lose (contact) with people. In Guatemala, my focus was entirely upon the team, leaders, teachers, volunteers, children, and the wider community. As for future interests in Mission, I am very committed to supporting and encouraging His Church to give, pray and go.”

A Team member wrote: ”This trip brought me so much closer to God. Preparing for this mission trip brought me back to God after years of turning my back on Him. Seeing what we have to what the people in Guatemala have, has me more thankful to God for my life…I just want to be closer to Him and to serve Him with all my heart.”

A Young man wrote: This Mission had a great effect on my life: to be able to experience such a part of the world, then returning to our own world and seeing it with new eyes. Everyone should take a trip like this.”

A Lady wrote: “This was an amazing experience from the beginning to the very last day. I loved every minute of it and feel so very blessed to have been part of it. »

Other comments included: “I left a large part of my heart in Guatemala; I want to go back every year. I was so humbled by the experience. I learned to speak the name of the Lord more clearly. »

We could fill a book, even a library, with testimonies! We humbly thank God for those who take the time and make the sacrifices necessary to be part of a Mission Team and to join us in what God is doing!

Why not join a Mission team?

 

Come to the Discover Your Impact Lunch Sunday, March 31 at 12:15pm in S-140 to learn about upcoming short term Mission trips at BelPres.  Questions?  Contact impactteams@belpres.org

 

 

 

Diversity in Unity

Imagining our Faith Community Differently

God loves all people and desires that all be saved. That love is clear and evident in the sacrifice of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. This is the hope that we have! Yet there are scores of individuals and groups of people, particularly those who are hurting and left out, who have yet to experience that love. We all can relate to pain and loss. There are those that, due to their disabilities, have experienced pain so deep that maybe few can understand outside of our Lord. They’ve experienced loss not only of personal aspirations, but also the loss of a community that loves and supports its members.

 What if it were different for our friends with disabilities? What if the Church responded differently to people that God longs to include into His family?

 We see in Scripture that this truly is the heart of God. “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.” (Mark 2:17). No matter our abilities we know that Jesus came because we all were unable to do this on our own. So, it is our responsibility as the body of Christ to reach out and invite, to share with others the hope that we have in God, and to love our neighbors unconditionally as God loves us.

 I was in India not long ago, visiting an impoverished slum in Mumbai. It was at a prayer service that I shared with everyone that we are no different and that in God’s eyes we are all equal. Just because I may have more money, I live in America, or my skin color is different does not mean I am better, even though in people’s eyes that may be the case. In His eyes, we are all on the same level. We all are made in His image and likeness. What is on the outside does not define us. This equality is summarized beautifully when Christ told us to show no partiality when we gather corporately (James 2:1-4). Truly we are all equal. That is the beauty of our faith!

 If we believe in the saving grace of our God and follow His steps as a community of believers, then it’s clear — it’s not our place to choose who is welcome and who is not welcome in His church. God invites all, and it is our responsibility to actively and intentionally pour out the love that Christ has placed in our hearts to our neighbors. This is not something that we do. It is who we are.

 Bridge Disability Ministries imagines Church as a place where all mankind can gather at the feet of Jesus, where we experience the gift of fellowship, the blessing of being in the family of God. If we intentionally reach out to our neighbors of all abilities, our faith community will be a lot closer to the way God had in mind all along.

 

Bridge Ministries is a partner ministry supported by BelPres Community Outreach and the Legacy Foundation.

On May 15, 2019, Bridge Ministries will host “Diversity in Unity: Imagining our Faith Communities Differently”. It will be held at the Westminster Chapel from 9 -4 PM. Join us as we strive—together—to bring about that which Christ desires. Register by March 31 with code: EARLYBIRD for 20% off

 

Survivor Cambodia

The DOVE Phnom Penh Onyx students, staff and volunteers headed to a retreat on an island off the coast of Cambodia, Koh Rong. It was the location for two seasons of the “reality” show, Survivor. As we approached the coast, it started raining. Tropical Storm Pabuk was in the Gulf of Thailand and authorities warned boats to expect high waves. On the bus ride, I wondered if we were going to make a new episode of Survivor. The staff monitored and prayed about the storm.
An Onyx lesson asks students to imagine that they are a boat, first undergoing repairs in dry dock and then setting sail to test seaworthiness. Lay, the DOVE Phnom Penh Coordinator, thought it fitting to end the year departing from a real port to sail on the ocean. When I heard they were going to Koh Rong, I was afraid I would get seasick crossing in a fishing boat. When Lay said they would take the 50-seat express ferry which is smoother and only takes 45 minutes, I decided to go. Despite Pabuk, the ferry was still running so we took off. I recalled that Jesus is Lord over the wind and waves.

Overall, the only significant effect of Pabuk was that we got seasick. When unloading another group of passengers at an island, waves near shore were so strong they couldn’t step onto the dock. Being tossed up and down, everyone started to look green.  I took off my life jacket and stood near the front deck where there was a breeze. We waited while a smaller boat was sent to transport the others ashore. We continued to Koh Rong and were able to step out on the dock. Friday night, the high surf washed up lots of trash and flotsam onto the beach, but it cleaned up quickly.

Making a scrapbook for the ensuing year, students spent Saturday morning reflecting on what they learned about God, themselves and relationships with others. They also made 2-3 year plans to fulfill or discern God’s vision for their life. That night, they took turns sharing and then prayed blessings for each other to fulfill those visions.

Because of the waves on Saturday, the ferry wasn’t running. The ferry ran again on but arrived late with oversold seats. After some discussion, they let everyone board. Lay and some other passengers wound up standing or sitting on luggage. I noticed two staff members, Serey and Virak, put on life jackets. I followed their lead! The ride back was a lot rougher, so I was grateful to dock back on the mainland. The one thing that approached a Survivor episode was Serey killing a 2-inch centipede crawling next to me on my bed. I carefully shook out all my clothes before and after packing at home.

The real survivors at Koh Rong were the Onyx students persevering the past year to finish the program. Instead of forming alliances against each other to become the sole survivor, they became a family where people share honestly.  Moreover, they’ve shown they have the heart to serve others.  Two students, Ngechsor and Pheakday, travel back to their province on Saturdays after class to share the Onyx lessons with the local church youth. Also, another small group planned and carried out a children’s outreach at a resettlement village near Phnom Penh, where one of them lives. As these students set sail after Onyx, we look forward to hearing further adventures of how God works through them to bless their communities.

Behind the Scenes with Heather Hedlund

Where is God calling you? What is your passion and purpose? Many of us are searching for answers to these questions. But even as a child, Heather Hedlund knew the Lord was calling her.

As a young teen, God put issues of justice on her heart and she daydreamed about how she would one day solve some of the world’s problems – perhaps the answer to homelessness or the path out of poverty.

When Heather feels a nudge from the Holy Spirit, she acts on it.  She prays for direction, educates herself, and takes initiative.

For example, after listening to former pastor Dick Leon’s call to the congregation for an assault on poverty, she joined a group to pray about it and study how poverty affected elementary-aged children in our local area. Soon after, KidREACH was established in Bellevue; a program Heather helped lead for 13 years.

“I will never forget the way Heather advocated for children and families as the director of KidREACH,” says Lisa Phelps, director of early childhood. “Heather truly loved each child and family, and advocated for them at school, in immigration matters, and for basic needs. God gave Heather a humble heart and the strength to serve in difficult situations, as Jesus did,”says Phelps.

Heather describes her service with KidREACH as a time of great learning. “My years in KidREACH opened my eyes to the issue of poverty and the pathways out of poverty. My views were challenged and I had to rethink the issue once I was exposed to real people who were suffering. It caused me to open my mind to new ideas,” she says.

After 13 years, and with much prayer and thoughtful decision-making, she stepped away to await God’s next call. “I wanted to be intentional about my next project. I knew God had called me both into and out of KidREACH, and I wanted to take my time to listen for my next calling,” says Heather.

A year later, while listening to guest speaker Dr. Brenda Salter McNeil speak on racial justice, Heather felt another nudge from the Lord – one she had apparently been preparing for and knew she couldn’t ignore.

“I had read several articles on racial justice and reconciliation, heard many news reports, and was aware of the unrest, hurt, and struggle of the country – but I hadn’t found a way to act on my passion,” Heather says. “I didn’t know what my next steps would look like, but I felt the Holy Spirit within me and I knew I had to learn more. I began to feel the same passion for racial justice and reconciliation and the Justice Team as I had for KidREACH.”

“Heather has an enormous caring heart,” says Elizabeth Hayford, director of missions administration. “Through her work leading our KidREACH program and now guiding our Justice and Reconciliation Team, she shows Jesus’ love by building bridges to connect and care for many who are marginalized,” she says. “Supporting Heather in her roles at church is a pleasure and gives me a glimpse into a person after God’s heart who is seeking to build God’s kingdom every day.”

As leader of the Justice and Reconciliation Team, Heather has broadened awareness of social justice issues by helping to bring opportunities to the congregation, like Frames and Filters and Under Our Skin workshops, Anti-Racism Bible studies, book groups, and more.

Tom Brewer, director of community outreach, describes Heather as dedicated to serving others, especially those more vulnerable. “Heather is a supremely capable and conscientious leader who demonstrates empathy, compassion, an indomitable spirit, and a get-it-done attitude,” Tom says. “When something important and challenging needs to be achieved, Heather is a leader you can rely on.”

“Opening myself up to new things and putting myself outside my comfort zone have taught me how to be teachable,” says Heather. “I discover not only what I know, but also what I don’t know. It has taught me humility,” she says, “so that I’m not so set in my notions and more willing to learn.”

Lisa Phelps, who has worked alongside Heather in KidREACH and attended several justice learning opportunities, sees Heather’s gifts firsthand. “The Lord has called Heather to serve the poor, seek justice, and share her God-given gifts. She has a remarkable intellect, curiosity, patience, and love,” says Lisa.

“Heather thinks and prays about what she has learned, and quietly works with others to create opportunities for all of us to learn, act and consider Jesus’ example.”

“I have gained so much,” Heather says. “My faith has been stretched by these opportunities. First, I have learned to depend on God. When the problems look too big to solve on my own, I trust that God will provide.

“We often hear Pastor Dudley pray ‘Break my heart for what breaks yours, Jesus.’ That is my prayer too, and my work in the areas of poverty and justice are places I feel clearly called by the Lord and led by the Holy Spirit.

“My advice to others is to find areas you are passionate about and listen for spiritual direction. There is so much we can do together to make a difference.”

Heather is married to husband Magnus and is the mother of Elise and Erik.

 

Behind the Scenes with Wyatt Cook

Life experience and perspective are gifts we gain with age. We look back and realize the life lessons we’ve learned over the years from the good times and the hardships we faced. Is there a way to share our hard-won experience with those who are struggling with similar life issues?

At Eastside Academy (EA) they’re always looking for adults willing to “share life” with a teen. Many young people are eager to connect with an adult who can help guide them through life’s twists and turns. For the past four years, Wyatt Cook mentored at Eastside Academy. Wyatt is an engineer, a pilot, an Auto Angels participant and long-time BelPres congregant. He has enjoyed his relationship with two EA mentees, with his second one just graduating in June 2018.  “Kids need a consistent adult in their life,” says Wyatt, “someone who will listen, share a relationship, and give them guidance. Ninety percent of being a mentor at EA is just showing up,” he explains, “and when you show up, you build trust and the rest naturally follows.”

Wyatt has attended BelPres for over 20 years and has lived in Bellevue most of his life.  He grew up with a very involved dad who spent considerable time doing activities with the family – from flying to fishing to skiing. He valued their relationship and the time they spent together.  He treasures their times together learning to restore an airplane, fly a plane, re-build a car and boat, as well as taking long, leisurely vacations with the family.

As his children moved into adulthood, Wyatt has spent some of his newfound free time volunteering at BelPres – “paying it forward” through his work with Eastside Academy. He sees less parental engagement in our society today, with families torn between increasing commitments and longer working hours. He feels strongly that kids need an adult in their life to help them through the confusing time of growing up.

As a mentor, he meets for lunch once a week with his mentee, and may take him on an outing 2-3 times a year. Wyatt has taken his mentees to the Museum of Flight and Mariners games.  He sometimes gives advice on education, career, or life choices and at other times just simply listens.  “I try to model a Christian life and be empathetic. But my consistent time with my student is what is most important – just knowing I am going to show up each time,” he explains.

Wyatt and his mentee Josh share an interest in engineering.   “My mentor, Wyatt, is my favorite thing about Eastside Academy,” says Josh. “He’s a pilot and knows a lot about what I want to do in my life. He helps me make plans for my future. We hang out at least once or twice a week, and I’m helping him construct an airplane at his house,” he says.

“As a mentor, your role is not as a friend or a parent, but more of a guiding adult in someone’s life. A rock for a younger person to lean on – an oasis to rest in.  Confidentiality is key. Eastside Academy has an excellent manual that helps you understand your role, and mentors meet quarterly at information meetings,” Wyatt explains.

With just a few years left until retirement from his job as a pilot for American Airlines, Wyatt enjoys the opportunity to mentor at EA and plans to start with a new student next year since Josh has graduated. He encourages others to not let the extreme issues kids are dealing with stop them from mentoring. He reminds us that after all, teens are still kids at heart.

“Wyatt is a fantastic part of the Eastside Academy Mentorship program,” says Anny IIlisoi, EA mentor and alumni coordinator. “He is very committed to his role as a mentor and it shows in his dedication to Josh and the school. Mentors are an incredibly important part of a student’s life at EA. Wyatt is a great example of how mentoring can make a positive impact on students in different areas of their lives,” she says.

Wyatt expects to stay in touch with his mentees in the years ahead. “My highest honor would be for one of them to call me someday in the future to talk – not to solve a problem but just to catch up, see how they are doing, and help them if I can,” says Wyatt.

Wyatt also volunteers for Auto Angels most Saturday mornings, where he can put his engineering expertise to work and where a handful of EA students also volunteer.

#belpresserve