Translation tidbit: Ifs, ands, or buts

In 1 Corinthians 15, Paul bases his argument for the resurrection of the dead on the claim that God raised Jesus to life: “But if it is preached that Christ has been raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead?” (1 Cor. 15:12, NIV). As I begin to draft the CT notes for translators on this verse, I see a number of issues that require explanation, including how to understand Paul’s use of a rhetorical question, how to translate with active verbs (in languages where the passive verbs aren’t natural), and how to unpack the abstract noun “resurrection.”

But I start with the small things. In Greek, the verse begins with a conjunction that functions in different ways. In some contexts, it’s translated as “and,” which is not how it’s used in this verse. The NIV translates it here as “but,” a valid option since Paul is contrasting the proclamation known to the Corinthians—that Christ is risen—with the competing claim that there is no resurrection. Another valid way to translate the conjunction is “now,” since it introduces a new stage in Paul’s discourse on the resurrection.

Then there’s the Greek word translated “if.” In this verse, it’s introducing a fact. However, in some African languages, the word “if” can only signal uncertainty about whether or not a statement is true. So our CT notes must point out that it may be clearer to translate with a word meaning “since.” Although these are little words, they are important links in the chain of Paul’s logic. In some languages, the meaning will be clearest if translators use a structure more like that of the Good News Bible: “Now, since our message is that Christ has been raised from death, how can some of you say that the dead will not be raised to life?”

Christ is risen indeed! Thank you for remembering my CT teammates and me in your prayers as we work together to provide tools that translators in many African languages will use to bring the good news to their people.

 

Gifts Continue to Give with the Alternative Gift Market

Thank you to everyone who purchased gifts from the BelPres Alternative Gift Market (AGM) last Christmas Season. The total raised by the 2018 AGM was $62,266. Every penny of the AGM funds goes directly toward your purchased gift. The funds are used by global and local ministries to support special projects and programs that fall out of their budget scope. It is exciting to send the money out and see the fruit from our support.
The cover of the 2018 AGM catalogue featured a refugee worker in one of the gardens. One of the global gift items was garden supplies for the refugees starting a new life and settling in Washington. This gift covered materials like seeds and tools to equip refugees to work in their garden preparing, planting, growing and harvesting their crops. Your donations raised over 1000 dollars for this gift.
World Relief shared new photos of recipients using tools bought with the most recent donations, and we want to share those with all of you who give so generously to support AGM each year. Chandra is from Bhutan, and he is holding some new tools that he will use to prepare his garden. Laylay is from Burma and is working in the garden with her daughter and her new hoe to turn over her garden bed winter cover crop.
Many thanks, again, for your support for the Alternative Gift Market. Your gifts make a difference in lives in our community and communities around the world.

Audience of One

Blogging for me is more therapeutic than anything else. Lately, people are asking me why I don’t blog more and when am I going to write again. Honestly, writing is hard. I’m not particularly good at it, and yet, it helps me process what is going on inside; especially, in my heart. I appreciate my friends’ encouragement though, so I’ll try to write more.

Looking back at my Lenten journey in college, it was a negative experience of my faith in Christ. After gathering on campus, we would all head out to different restaurants to just hang and connect. The only reason I knew it was Lent was all the water bottles everyone had, and no one was ordering food, even though we were at a restaurant. I remember asking: “Why is everyone carrying a water bottle? Why is no one eating at that whole table?” Oh yeah, it’s Lent! And they’re fasting. I thought why in the world meet in a restaurant if they weren’t going to eat. It was evident to everyone around them that they were fasting. Some were happy to talk about it. From that experience, I realized I couldn’t stand the public persona of spiritual discipline. It all looked and smelled of hypocrisy.

Jesus said, Matt. 6:16-18 “When you fast, do not look somber as the hypocrites do, for they disfigure their faces to show men they are fasting. I tell you the truth; they have received their reward in full. But when you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that it will not be obvious to people that you are fasting, but only to your Father, who is unseen; and your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.”

Jesus had it right: if you engage in spiritual disciplines, do it in private. God wants an audience of one; just you and Him. Even if you have to stop and break a spiritual discipline (because not doing so would make it public), then I would do it. You can reengage in a spiritual discipline afterward. Once it becomes public, there goes the ‘audience of one.’ More important than the discipline is our relationship with God. Since then, I rarely tell anyone of my spiritual discipline practice. I am far from where I want to be with spiritual disciplines, and I hope to continue becoming more and more like Jesus. He did things right.